Tag Archives: RAID

Windows Update – Service not running or Windows System apps appear as from unknown publisher

There are two symptoms to the same problem in Microsoft Windows:

  1. Windows Update cannot currently check for updates, because the service is not running. You may need to restart your computer
  2. When you Run As Administrator mmc.exe, notepad.exe, regedit.exe and any other program, you get — Do you want to allow the following program from an unknown publisher to make changes to this computer?

These errors started to appear after one of the Intel RAID 1 (Intel ICH8R/ICH10R SATA RAID controller) drives have failed, and was replaced with the new drive. The RAID rebuilt was successful, however the above symptoms have appeared.

Where is the problem?

Windows Cryptographic Services. The service have two folders under Windows/System32 directory:
C:\Windows\System32\catroot
and
C:\Windows\System32\catroot2

One of them have the log file – edb.log, that was full of the error messages.

CatalogDB: 18:50:01 AM 05/16/2016: JetInit Corruption
CatalogDB: 18:50:01 AM 05/16/2016: catadnew.cpp at line #1900 encountered JET error -583
CatalogDB: 18:50:01 AM 05/16/2016: catadnew.cpp at line #901 encountered JET error -583
CatalogDB: 18:50:01 AM 05/16/2016: JetInit Corruption
CatalogDB: 18:50:01 AM 05/16/2016: catadnew.cpp at line #1921 encountered JET error -583
CatalogDB: 18:50:01 AM 05/16/2016: catadnew.cpp at line #911 encountered JET error -583
CatalogDB: 18:50:02 AM 05/16/2016: JetInit Corruption
CatalogDB: 18:50:02 AM 05/16/2016: catdbsvc.cpp at line #755 encountered JET error -583
CatalogDB: 18:50:02 AM 05/16/2016: catdbsvc.cpp at line #969 encountered JET error -583
CatalogDB: 18:50:02 AM 05/16/2016: catdbsvc.cpp at line #6724 encountered JET error -583
CatalogDB: 18:50:02 AM 05/16/2016: catdbsvc.cpp at line #6918 encountered JET error -583
CatalogDB: 18:50:02 AM 05/16/2016: catdbsvc.cpp at line #7075 encountered JET error -583
CatalogDB: 18:50:02 AM 05/16/2016: catdbsvc.cpp at line #3454 encountered JET error -583
CatalogDB: 18:50:02 AM 05/16/2016: catdbsvc.cpp at line #2702 encountered JET error -583

Also in the GUID-named subfolders there are two database files called “catdb”.
C:\Windows\System32\catroot2\{127D0A1D-4EF2-11D1-8608-00C04FC295EE}\catdb
and
C:\Windows\System32\catroot2\{F750E6C3-38EE-11D1-85E5-00C04FC295EE}\catdb

They both were missing. Folders were empty… And do not try to copy them from another PC. It would not work. Windows will automatically delete them after Cryptographic Service is started.

Where is the solution?

Update your RAID driver! Yes simple as that, update driver (to at least version: 11.7.0.1013 from 12/3/2012), and these files are regenerated automatically. On modern Intel i7 CPU it took about 1 hour.

P.S. I believe that this applies not only to Windows 7, but also to Windows 8.1 and Windows 10.
P.S.S. Running Microsoft Windows Resource Checker (SFC.exe) does not do anything useful in this case.

RAID 1 (mirror) read speed as fast as RAID 0 (stripe)

To our big surprise, the new Intel Raid controller on the Motherboard Intel DX79TO (ver. AAG28805-401) with Intel X79 Express Chipset shows awesome read performance.

The raid model is Intel Rapid Storage Technology enterprise 3.0 (Intel Rapid Storage enterprise – SATA Option ROM – 3.0.1.1370, 2003-2011), which in Microsoft Windows is reported as “Intel C600 Series Chipset SATA RAID Controller”.

Usually, with old Intel RAID models (till ICH10R?), RAID 1 mirror reads only from the one drive at the same time. The last time we tested this, was November 2010 with Intel RAID controller ICH10R.

Now, our test shows, that the new Intel RAID 1 reads from the both mirror drives simultaneously. Writing speed stays the same, however reading speed is twice as fast. Basically, you get read performance the same as from RAID 0 stripe.

Our test setup.

For more details, see the screenshots at the end of this post.

Test results.

HD Tune for SSD shows 957.0 MB/s
HD Tune for SSD shows 957.0 MB/s
HD Tune for HDD shows 182.0 MB/s
HD Tune for HDD shows 182.0 MB/s
9 folders with 20 GB test files. 213.85 MB/s Seagate HDD RAID 1 speed.
9 folders with 20 GB test files. 213.85 MB/s Seagate HDD RAID 1 speed.
Hash & CRC SSD RAID 1 reading speed 1.03 GB/s
Hash & CRC SSD RAID 1 reading speed 1.03 GB/s
FAR Manager SSD RAID 1 reading speed 911.87 MB/s. Little slower, because of NUL device.
FAR Manager SSD RAID 1 reading speed 911.87 MB/s. Little slower, because of NUL device.
FAR Manager HDD RAID 1 reading speed 206.61 MB/s.
FAR Manager HDD RAID 1 reading speed 206.61 MB/s.
Windows Expirience Index via winsat for both drives
Windows Expirience Index via winsat for both drives

Conclusion.

It is possible to get a stunning HDD/SSD read performance with consumer grade hardware. Also, note that in this setup the SSD reading speeds exceeds 1000 MB/s or 1 GB/s. The whole setup costs about $1500.

Winsat for both drives, text version:

C:\Windows\system32>winsat disk -drive d
Windows System Assessment Tool
> Running: Feature Enumeration ''
> Run Time 00:00:00.00
> Running: Storage Assessment '-drive d -ran -read'
> Run Time 00:00:05.89
> Running: Storage Assessment '-drive d -seq -read'
> Run Time 00:00:04.16
> Running: Storage Assessment '-drive d -seq -write'
> Run Time 00:00:04.48
> Running: Storage Assessment '-drive d -flush -seq'
> Run Time 00:00:03.39
> Running: Storage Assessment '-drive d -flush -ran'
> Run Time 00:00:10.89
> Running: Storage Assessment '-drive d -hybrid -ran -read -ransize 4096'
NV Cache not present.
> Run Time 00:00:00.00
> Running: Storage Assessment '-drive d -hybrid -ran -read -ransize 16384'
NV Cache not present.
> Run Time 00:00:00.00
> Disk Random 16.0 Read 2.73 MB/s 4.5
> Disk Sequential 64.0 Read 151.95 MB/s 7.1
> Disk Sequential 64.0 Write 170.69 MB/s 7.2
> Average Read Time with Sequential Writes 2.495 ms 6.8
> Latency: 95th Percentile 48.211 ms 1.9
> Latency: Maximum 228.174 ms 7.2
> Average Read Time with Random Writes 11.562 ms 4.1
> Total Run Time 00:00:29.69
C:\Windows\system32>
C:\Windows\system32>
C:\Windows\system32>
C:\Windows\system32>
C:\Windows\system32>winsat disk -drive c
Windows System Assessment Tool
> Running: Feature Enumeration ''
> Run Time 00:00:00.00
> Running: Storage Assessment '-drive c -ran -read'
> Run Time 00:00:00.22
> Running: Storage Assessment '-drive c -seq -read'
> Run Time 00:00:02.45
> Running: Storage Assessment '-drive c -seq -write'
> Run Time 00:00:02.16
> Running: Storage Assessment '-drive c -flush -seq'
> Run Time 00:00:00.59
> Running: Storage Assessment '-drive c -flush -ran'
> Run Time 00:00:00.59
> Running: Storage Assessment '-drive c -hybrid -ran -read -ransize 4096'
NV Cache not present.
> Run Time 00:00:00.02
> Running: Storage Assessment '-drive c -hybrid -ran -read -ransize 16384'
NV Cache not present.
> Run Time 00:00:00.00
> Disk Random 16.0 Read 252.32 MB/s 8.0
> Disk Sequential 64.0 Read 892.28 MB/s 8.4
> Disk Sequential 64.0 Write 491.88 MB/s 8.1
> Average Read Time with Sequential Writes 0.226 ms 8.5
> Latency: 95th Percentile 0.432 ms 8.7
> Latency: Maximum 2.235 ms 8.8
> Average Read Time with Random Writes 0.228 ms 8.8
> Total Run Time 00:00:06.39

Replacing motherboard with Intel RAID 1 (mirror)

Yesterday I needed to replace motherboard with active boot volume, that consisted of RAID 1 (mirror).

There were two possibilities of where Intel RAID controller (ICH10R) keeps RAID configurations:

  • in controller
  • in RAID HDDs
  • in both places

How things went:

  • Power off
  • Replace broken motherboard with new one
  • Power on
  • First boot slow (perhaps installing drivers)
  • Everything works without doing anything

So my guess is – configuration is kept inside hard disk drives (HDD), and perhaps in RAID controller too.

So if your RAID controller or motherboard has died, you can replace it without need to rebuild RAID volume.

Involved motherboards:

  • EVGA SLI LE
  • EVGA X58 CLASSIFIED 3

P.S. Windows 7 Ultimate didn’t asked to re-activate after replacement.