Tag Archives: STL

Watch window shows ‘CXX0058: Error: overloaded operator not found’

If you add a Watch for std::vector using array subscript operator, like, myVector[5], then Visual Studio 2010 instead of showing value, will show the error: ‘CXX0058: Error: overloaded operator not found’. However when you cover std::vector with mouse, the tooltip watch will show correct values.

CXX0058: Error: overloaded operator not found

The workaround for the STL vector is to use:
myVector._Myfirst[5]
instead of
myVector[5]

Found this solution in StackOverflow.

‘auto’ in C++ is the same as ‘var’ in C#

auto in C++ is the same as var in C#. Auto keyword is defined in upcoming C++ standard C++0x

The news is, that latest Microsoft Visual Studio C++ 2010 have support for this keyword. auto keyword has a new meaning – ‘declares a variable whose type is deduced from the initialization expression in its declaration’.

Old C++

std::vector intArray;
intArray.push_back(10);
intArray.push_back(20);
intArray.push_back(30);
std::vector::const_iterator iterator = intArray.begin();

New C++

std::vector intArray;
intArray.push_back(10);
intArray.push_back(20);
intArray.push_back(30);
auto iterator = intArray.begin();

As you see, ‘std::vector::const_iterator iterator’ becomes ‘auto iterator’. No more unnecessary typing.

The same concept in C# is available from version 3.0. Variables that are declared at method scope can have an implicit type var. An implicitly typed local variable is strongly typed just as if you had declared the type yourself, but the compiler determines the type. Reference.

P.S. Open source world are using auto keyword for at least a year. Support for auto keyword was added to GCC beginning from version 4.4.0

It seems that _SECURE_SCL_THROWS is deprecated in Visual Studio C++ 2010

It seems that _SECURE_SCL_THROWS is deprecated in Visual Studio C++ 2010. Because include file ‘Microsoft Visual Studio 10.0\VC\include\yvals.h’ has the following code block:

#if _SECURE_SCL_THROWS
#ifndef _SILENCE_DEPRECATION_OF_SECURE_SCL_THROWS
...
#undef _SECURE_SCL_THROWS
#pragma _CRT_WARNING( _DEPRECATE_SECURE_SCL_THROWS )
...

It gets undefined, and if you search c++ header files, there are no references to _SECURE_SCL_THROWS anymore. The strange part is, that latest documentation still have reference to _SECURE_SCL_THROWS, which states that it is valid macro, and ‘Defines whether incorrect use of Checked Iterators causes an exception or a program termination’.

The good news is, that _SECURE_SCL is enabled by default, that causes _ITERATOR_DEBUG_LEVEL to be enabled, that causes iterators to break program debug version if you do something wrong with stl iterators.